According to a Pew Research Center survey, roughly half of US teens ages 13 to 17 say they use Facebook, compared to 71% in 2015.  Meanwhile, 85% of teens say they use YouTube, 72% use Instagram and 69% use Snapchat.  Today, roughly half (51%) of U.S. teens ages 13 to 17 say they use Facebook, notably lower than the shares who use YouTube, Instagram or Snapchat…

 

Most notably, smartphone ownership has become a nearly ubiquitous element of teen life: 95% of teens now report they have a smartphone or access to one.  These mobile connections are in turn fueling more-persistent online activities: 45% of teens now say they are online on a near-constant basis…

 

In 2018, three online platforms other than Facebook – YouTube, Instagram and Snapchat – are used by sizable majorities of this age group.  Meanwhile, 51% of teens now say they use Facebook.  The shares of teens who use Twitter and Tumblr are largely comparable to the shares who did so in the 2014-2015 survey.

Source: Pew Research

Lightbulb Moment: The communication trail spreads out like trails in an ant farm.  The bridges between connect them, making the variety of pathways endless but seamless at the same time.  The trick is timing and consistency so your voice is felt at the same pitch and volume across mediums.  While Millennials were born into the beginning of the online age and have grown with it, Gen Z doesn’t know anything else.  They are more tech savvy than Millennials and if they cannot reach you, they will move on.